Where to Avail of an Aggressive Beaumont Insurance Claim Lawyer

If you have purchased and paid for an insurance policy only to find out that the insurance provider refuses or denies your claim by the time you want to avail of the benefits that you are entitled to under the policy, then the next best thing that you should do is to get a lawyer who can help you win your case. If you are based in Texas, Beaumont insurance claim lawyer can more conveniently assist you in protecting your interest under the policy. There are actually many firms and lawyers in Beaumont that has the expertise and the practice experience in managing insurance claims of defrauded clients.

One of the best firms that have aggressively defended insurance claims even against large and established insurance companies is the Brent Coon and Associates. The firm represents clients with insurance claims in Latin America, in the United States including Texas. Beaumont insurance claim lawyer employed by the firm has defended and made a good case even against great insurers such as Allstate insurance companies.

If you met an accident or you caused a damaged through a car accident, then you should be able to get a Beaumont insurance claim lawyer. The lawyer is very knowledgeable when it comes to the transportation laws that are being implemented in the city and even the ordinances that are put in place. The insurance lawyer are at best position to help you win your case or to help you advance your case. They know exactly when to compromise and how to best avail of the benefits offered by your insurance policy. This is the advantage that you get when you avail of an insurance lawyer.

If you are a victim of personal injury or property damage, you know that insurance can help you get your feet back and be able to settle or pay the damaged property. However, in situations where the insurance company that is supposed to pay for it refuses to pay your claim or wants to reduce your claim, the you should not hesitate to get an insurance claim lawyer and let him handle the case for you to be able to get whatever benefits that were withheld and claim whatever is due to you under the insurance policy.

No Lawyer Required – Small Claims Court

Your best friend, or someone you thought of as a friend, asked you for a loan of $2,500.00. You had the money, and you liked the guy, so you said okay. Two months have passed, and he bought a new house. You know he’s not hurting. You called him after you heard about the house and asked when he was going to pay you back. He said he had huge expenses now because of the new house. He said soon. Two weeks later you called again. Again he said soon. You just put the phone down. You’re tired of calling. He said soon again. What to do next?

This situation sounds like a case for small claims court. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Letter

Write your friend a letter. Tell him that he has two weeks to pay you back. Tell him you want to resolve his payment to you in a friendly manner, but if you do not receive a check within two weeks, you will see him in small claims court.

We’re hoping that the letter resolves the non-payment problem. If it does not, you’ll have to continue to step two.

2. File a claim

Go to your local small claims court and complete the forms. You can probably download the forms from your county’s small claims website. Submit the forms to the small claims court. The court will schedule a hearing.

3. Service of process

Your friend has become the defendant. He must be served at least 15 days before the hearing date if the defendant lives in San Francisco county. If the defendant does not live in the county, s/he must be served at least 20 days before the hearing date. A capable adult must serve a true copy of the claim. You cannot serve the defendant.

4. Evidence

You next gather all evidence to submit at the hearing. Evidence would include a copy of the cancelled check that you gave your friend and dates and notes of all phone calls that you made to him. You may want to take a photo of his new house.

5. At the hearing

Small claims courts are generally much more informal that other courts. The judge will ask you questions, and then s/he’ll ask your friend, the defendant, questions.

If you have presented the situation with evidence, the judge will probably rule in your favor.

You’ve won your case, and your friend is now going to pay you back, but suppose he doesn’t. Suppose he is a real jerk and has decided that he wants you to have to work just a little harder to get your money back.

6. Collecting a judgment

You have to collect the judgment. The defendant may pay the amount directly to the court. If the defendant does not have the money, the defendant may have to pay installments.

If your friend refuses to pay, you can complete an Application and Order for Appearance and Examination which would require your friend to appear in small claims court to have his income and resources examined.

You could also consider wage garnishment by completing a Writ of Execution. This writ could also levy your friend’s checking or other bank account.

If your friend has a business with a cash register, a sheriff can go to the business for a till tap. The sheriff can take enough money from the cash register to pay the judgment debt. The typical sheriff’s fee for a till tap is $85.00. We hope your friend doesn’t put you in this situation, but if you are ever in this situation, the purpose of small claims courts is to resolve small problems without the expense of an attorney. This is the do it yourself legal remedy.

Disclaimer: This article is not to be considered legal advice. If you need legal advice, seek out a licensed attorney. Remember that small claims courts do not require an attorney. If, however, the losing defendant appeals the small claims court’s decision, the new venue is a superior court. In a superior court, you will need an attorney.

Legal Information in a Background Check

Background Checks. Although the word may seem scary, this is not something to be feared. In fact, it’s a normal part of life, and at some point everybody will have a background check done on them. There are a multitude of reasons why a background check could be done reasons varying from a new job, before moving into a new apartment or condominium and more. And although you have no control what appears on the background check report (your history is your past, and there’s very little you can do to change the past), you do have the right to protect your privacy by knowing what is legal and what is not legal information on a background check report.

A background check usually contains a lot of different information. Most of the information is compliant with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) but sometimes you may find information that seems either out of place or unnecessary. There are people that legally can have all the information, for example, any jobs involving the government, FBI or police. In those cases, the government is allowed to know all information because it is in regards to national safety. In all other cases where the government is not involved, access to that information is denied. An important step to ensuring your privacy is by asking what information is requested on the background check. If the employer or renter (or whomever) gives an unclear answer or disregards the question all together, have them write down exactly what information they are looking for. That way, if something on the background check shows up that was not originally communicated; you are able to take the appropriate steps to clear things up.

Every company has different policies on what information they need. The general standard check can include any or all of the following; felony and misdemeanor arrest and conviction charges, education and professional license verifications, employment checks, social security verifications, sexual offender checks, motor vehicle reports, federal criminal checks, reference checks, civil litigation, OIG database, federal bankruptcy and many others. There is also an industry standard to how long this information can be used for hire. The FCRA also states that a company can go back seven years for hire. Any older information is declared illegal and must be discarded.

If by some off chance you do end up finding information there are steps you can take. The best step is to have a conversation with the other party, and for the most part, any problem that you may have can be solved easily. Furthermore, if the problem still hasn’t been solved, try consulting a lawyer. If the information provided is old and past the seven year scope, there is legal action that can be taken.

When a company or person requires a background check it is important to know your rights regarding your privacy. If you suspect that there is illegal information on your background check report, there actions you can take so that you are protected.